Tag Archives: MSWTUC

My review of “Threads of Life. A History of the World Through the Eye of a Needle” Clare Hunter

I found this book in a charity shop and it opened my eyes to a different world; the world of sewing and the important place it has in all of our memories. As a socialist I have marched behind and … Continue reading

Posted in book review, Communism, education, feminism, Ireland, Irish second generation, labour history, North of Ireland, political women, Salford, Socialism, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

My review of “A Most Unladylike Occupation” Lisa Wright

  Lucy Deane was one of the first female Factory Inspectors in 1893. In this novel, Lisa Wright, a distant relative of Lucy’s, captures the life and history of a pioneering woman. It was the Home Secretary, Herbert Asquith, who … Continue reading

Posted in biography, book review, education, feminism, labour history, novels, political women, trade unions, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Rising Up; How the MSWTUC worked with the Bakers’ Union to organise women confectioners.

In 2018 the numbers of trade union members is on the decline: many young people do not see the point of joining. Some unions, such as the Baking Food and Allied Workers Union, are bucking that trend and young  people … Continue reading

Posted in education, feminism, human rights, labour history, Manchester, political women, Salford, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

My review of “The Caseroom” by Kate Hunter

  This is a unique novel; how many are written by female  trade union activists about the history of women’s roles in trade unions and the struggle for equality at work? The Caseroom is set during a dynamic period of … Continue reading

Posted in anti-cuts, book review, feminism, labour history, novels, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , | 4 Comments