Category Archives: Manchester

Book Review; Women Workers and the Trade Unions by Sarah Boston

Where can you read about the history of the trade union movement? Over the years I have been on many trade union courses,  but none of them gave me any insight into the history of my union or the origins … Continue reading

Posted in book review, feminism, human rights, labour history, Manchester, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Minutes of Manchester and Salford Women’s Trades Union Council 1903-1905

This is my fourth post about the Manchester and Salford Women’s Trade Union Council, and covers the years 1903-1905. By 1903 the Council was an established organisation which  individuals and organisations contacted,  not just for help with organising women into … Continue reading

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Minutes of Manchester and Salford Womens TUC 1900-1902

This is the third post about my work on the MSWTUC Transcription Project. From 1900 onwards  the MSWTUC changed in many ways. Up to this point it had been involved in organising women in laundries, bookbinding, shirtmaking, fancy box making, … Continue reading

Posted in education, feminism, labour history, Manchester, political women, Salford, Socialism, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rojava; the real alternative. My review of “The Alternative Towards a New Progressive Politics” edited by Lisa Nandy MP, Caroline Lucas MP and Chris Bowers; and “Revolution in Rojava” by Michael Knapp, Anja Flach and Ercan Ayboga.

In 1925 the Manchester Irish trade unionist Mary Quaile led a TUC delegation to the new Soviet Union. Mary had spent her life working at a grassroots level with women workers; advocating for women’s involvement in trade unions so that … Continue reading

Posted in book review, Communism, education, feminism, human rights, labour history, Manchester, Middle East, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history | Tagged , | Leave a comment

1897/98/99 MSWTUC organising women Cigar makers, Jewish Tailoresses and Upholsteresses.

During  the years 1897, 1898 and 1899  the Manchester and Salford Women’s Trade Union Council continued their work of organising women into trade unions, researching the experiences of women at work, and lobbying for better work conditions for women workers. … Continue reading

Posted in education, feminism, human rights, labour history, Manchester, political women, Salford, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

1896: Minutes of Manchester and Salford Women’s Trades Union Council

This is the second post of the Transcription Project and it is 1896. In 1896 the Council held its first Annual Meeting  in February and  began the year by joining together with other organisations to investigate the working conditions of … Continue reading

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Read my weekly roundup of radical arts and politics…Burning Doors, Daredevil Rides to Jarama, Kinsley Women Cleaners, Sounds and Sweet Airs

            Watch some political theatre. My favourite writer and socialist, Jim Allen, said of his plays; “I hope that the audience demand answers and action. I’m not keen on sending them to bed happy-I want … Continue reading

Posted in anti-cuts, book review, drama, education, feminism, human rights, labour history, Manchester, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment