Category Archives: International Women’s Day

Margaret Mullarkey; working class, Boltonian, IBRG activist

  In archiving the history of IBRG it is noticeable how many women were active as national officers as well as playing a more hidden role as the backbone of the organisation at a branch level. Margaret was one of … Continue reading

Posted in education, feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, Ireland, Irish second generation, labour history, North of Ireland, political women, Socialist Feminism, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , | 1 Comment

My review of “Betty Tebbs – a radical working class hero” by Mark Metcalf

      Through my friendship with Eddie and Ruth Frow I have met many women like Betty who had been  activists in the CPGB and the trade union movement. We came from different generations – and had quite different … Continue reading

Posted in Betty Tebbs, biography, book review, Communism, education, feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, Irish second generation, labour history, Manchester, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

The IBRG archive at the WCML. Part Four; How Irish women played an active role in IBRG.

In the 1970s the Irish community in Britain was represented by the Federation of Irish Societies; an organisation made up of mainly men who were Irish born. IBRG was set up in 1981 because of the F.I.S.’s reluctance to speak … Continue reading

Posted in feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, Ireland, Irish second generation, labour history, Manchester, North of Ireland, political women, Socialism, Socialist Feminism, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Following in Sylvia’s footsteps; from 1918 to 2018. Meet Charlotte, Josephine, Eden and Lauren.

Sylvia Pankhurst’s  response to the 1918 Representation of the People Act reflected her politics. She had opposed the First World War from the start and  spent the war years defending the rights of poor women and children in the East … Continue reading

Posted in anti-cuts, Communism, education, feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, labour history, political women, Socialist Feminism, Tameside, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

A Better World for Women: British Women Trade Unionists visit the Soviet Union in 1925

In 2017 it feels  like the word hope has left the political vocabulary. Politics today seems to be all  about trying to hang  on to our jobs and our public services. It feels as if we are all in the … Continue reading

Posted in book review, Communism, feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, labour history, Manchester, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, Uncategorized, women, working class history, young people | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Why we need to reclaim International Women’s Day from the middle class feminists!

I have grown to hate International Women’s Day. As the lives of women (and the partners we live with) deteriorate under the Tory government with the collaboration of Labour councils, the meaning  of the annual Day, started by Socialist women … Continue reading

Posted in anti-cuts, book review, Communism, education, feminism, human rights, International Women's Day, Palestine, political women, Socialist Feminism, trade unions, working class history | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Stop,Look,Listen…my weekly selection of favourite films, books and events to get you out of the house

    Watch Welcome to Leith…Leith as in North Dakota USA. A documentary set in a barren, if beautiful landscape. It is a landscape that is slowly emptying of people; there are only 24 people in Leith including one black … Continue reading

Posted in anti-cuts, drama, education, feminism, films, human rights, International Women's Day, labour history, Manchester, Palestine, peace campaigns, political women, Socialist Feminism, Uncategorized, women, working class history | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment