Stop,Look,Listen…my weekly selection of favourite films, books and events to get you out of the house

Watch..Who Pays the Ferryman (DVD) It was made in 1977, and much of it was filmed in Crete. This is 1970s BBC TV drama at its best. Alan Haldane (Jack Hedley) returns to Greece and the village where he fought alongside the Greek resistance against the Nazis. But the woman he loved has died and he finds out that she had his child many years before. Haldane decides to stay and live near his daughter but he keeps this a secret from her and his lover’s sister with whom he starts an affair. What makes this an enthralling drama is the relationship between Haldane and Annika (Betty Arvaniti), a very positive role model for a woman even today, and the way in which the storyline makes you want to keep watching. Crete in 1977 was very different from today and it is fascinating to see the scenes of life in the village and the locals who acted as extras. Highly recommended.

Remembering… the reality of the First World War.Sadly there have been no decent anti-war events in the north west yet. Instead we are deluged with propaganda about how the population of the country supported the war. That are some really good events in London, so if you are down there have a look at this blog see . Hopefully the Mary Quaile Club will organise an event for the Autumn.

Read... Sweetly Sings Delaney by John Harding. Everyone knows her name and that she wrote A Taste of Honey at age 19 but little is known about her life and her career. This is a superbly written and well researched biography of Shelagh and the ten years of her life from 1958-1968. In 2014 we have forgotten how rare women writers were at this time and the discrimination they faced when trying to get their work on stage or TV. Shelagh wrote about Salford and much, much more and this book shows how original and innovative she was. Some things do not change ie the attitude of Salford Council to progressive people: the reaction of them to her work could be mirrored today when we see what Salford funds in terms of the arts. Buy it from Read my article about modern day Shelaghs at

Go and see..Angel Meadow by Irish theatre company ANU which is the first production of HOME, a combination of the old Library Theatre and Cornerhouse. Set in Angel Meadow, behind Great Ancoats Street, there is a tenuous link to the original Angel Meadow and the show resembles a Dublin take on Gangs of New York. So it’s full of stereotypes of the Irish, violent, tribal and bordering on the insane. The action takes place in the delapidated pub, the Edinburgh Castle, and we are taken through a series of rooms and brutal scenes of the lives of the inhabitants of Angel Meadow. What is fascinating about the production is the energy and acting skills of the performers. It is more of a physical theatre performance as there is little in terms of story or narrative running through the 70 minute performance. Don’t wear any decent clothes, leave your stilettos at home and bring your aggressive attitude as you become part of the show…

And at the other end of theatre life and budgets in Manchester….visit 3 Minute Theatre and see another exciting show Living With Mr Happy or A True Story of Life, Love and Trainspotting. See it 16-21 June further info at

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About lipstick socialist

I am an activist and writer. My interests include women, class, culture and history. From an Irish in Britain background I am a republican and socialist. All my life I have been involved in community and trade union politics and I believe it is only through grass roots politics that we will get a better society. This is reflected in my writing, in my book Northern ReSisters Conversations with Radical Women and my involvement in the Mary Quaile Club. I am a member of the Manchester and Salford National Union of Journalists.If you want to contact me please use my gmail which is lipsticksocialist636
This entry was posted in biography, book review, drama, films, human rights, Ireland, Manchester, peace campaigns, TV drama, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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